An article to be shortly published (Šegon et al., 2016) deals with the association of newly found meteor showers and their possible parent bodies, among which the 66-Draconids meteor shower and asteroid 2001XQ.

According to dynamical modeling results for 2016 by Jérémie Vaubaillon, the 66-Draconids meteor shower might show some enhanced activity on December 2nd (around 21h30m UT) and December 3rd (around 07h00m UT).

Meteoroid cloud associated to 2001XQ in earth vicinity from November 29 until December 7. Our planet may come close to two regions of the stream with higher particles densities on December 2nd (~21h 30m UT) and December 3rd (~07h 00m UT). This could potentially lead to slight meteor activitvy enhancement from a radiant located between Draco and cepheus. Credit: Segon et al., 2016
Meteoroid cloud associated with 2001XQ asteroid in the vicinity of the Earth from November 29 until December 7. Our planet may come close to two regions of the stream with higher particles densities on December 2nd (~21h 30m UT) and December 3rd (~07h 00m UT). This could potentially lead to slight meteor activity enhancement from a radiant located between Draco and Cepheus. Credit: Jérémie Vaubaillon/IMCCE/CINES

The theoritical radiant would be located at RA = 310°, Dec. = +64° position, which locate it between Draco and Cepheus, in a circumpolar position for most mid-Northern latitudes.

Theoretical position of the 66-Draconid meteor shower according to dynamical results. The mean radiant should be located at coordinates RA = 310° and Dec. = +64°. Credit: Segon et al., 2016
Theoretical position of the 66-Draconid meteor shower radiant according to dynamical results. The mean position of the radiant is at coordinates RA = 310° and Dec. = 64°. Credit: Jérémie Vaubaillon/IMCCE/CINES

It thus lies high in the sky at the beginning of the night, so first potential activity enhancement (Dec. 2, 21h30m UT) will be better observed from Europe and the second (Dec. 3, 07h00m UT) from Western North America. Calculated entry velocity of meteoroids will be close to 21 km/s, leading to slow apparent speed meteors.

Position of the 66-Draconids radiant relative to the constellations.
Position of the 66-Draconids radiant relative to the constellations.

No real outburst is predicted, but any reported sign (or absence) of activity from this source would be highly welcome for further studies on the topic.

Thanks in advance, and clear skies!

References:
Šegon D., Vaubaillon J., Gural P., Vida D.,  Andreić Z., Andreić K., Skokić I., 2016. Dynamical modeling validation of parent bodies associated with newly discovered CMN meteor showers. Astronomy & Astrophysics, in press, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201629100.

 

3 comments

  • Together with Ina Rendtel, we observed from a location west of Potsdam, Germany, on Dec 2, 1955-2230UT under good conditions (LM approx 6.3-6.5) and noted ZERO meteors fitting the shower’s radiant and velocity (18 km/s, i.e. very slow). I know of a further report by Christoph Gerber near Heidelberg, Germany, 2135-2155 UT under less favourable conditions – also reporting no meteors of the 66 Draconids.
    Jurgen Rendtel – just back from the observing session…

    Reply to Jurgen Rendtel
    • I saw one possible candidate between 21:33 and 23:41 UT, a +4 magnitude meteor at 21:38 UT. The total number of meteors recorded during the session was 21.

      Reply to Javor Kac
  • A camera in our network detected a possible member on Dec.3 1237UT, -1 mag. But just only one was detected and single station.

    Reply to Hanjie Tan

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