Activity Outlook

Weekly Meteor Activity Outlook articles by Bob Lunsford. Bob gives outlooks to upcoming meteor activity about once a week. He features showers from the working list of meteor showers as well as suspected radiants. Please refer only to the radiants of the Working list of visual meteor showers in observing reports.

Meteor Activity Outlook for July 13-19, 2013

During this period the moon reaches its first quarter phase on Monday July 15th. At this time the moon is located ninety degrees east of the sun and will be in the sky until midnight local daylight time (LDT) as seen from mid-northern latitudes. As the week progresses the waxing gibbous moon will set later during the morning hours, interfering with morning observations. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near three no matter your location. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near fourteen as seen from mid-northern latitudes and thirteen as seen from mid-southern latitudes.

Meteor Activity Outlook for July 6-12, 2013

During this period the moon reaches its new phase on Monday July 8th. At this time the moon is located near the sun and is not visible at night. As the week progresses the waxing crescent moon will enter the evening sky but will set long before the more active morning hours arrive. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near three as seen from the northern hemisphere and four as seen from south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near sixteen no matter your location. The actual rates will also depend on factors such as personal light and motion perception, local weather conditions, alertness and experience in watching meteor activity.

Meteor Activity Outlook for June 29-July 5, 2013

Meteor season finally gets going in July for the northern hemisphere. The first half of the month will be much like June. After the 15th though, both sporadic and shower rates increase significantly. For observers in the southern hemisphere, sporadic rates will be falling but the overall activity will increase with the arrival of the Delta Aquariids during the last third of the month.

Meteor Activity Outlook for June 22-28, 2013

During this period the moon reaches its full phase on Sunday June 23th. At this time the moon is located opposite the sun and remains above the horizon for most of the night. As the week progresses the waning gibbous moon will rise later and later but will still be high in the sky during the more active morning hours, reducing the number of meteors to be seen. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near two as seen from the northern hemisphere and three as seen from south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near four as seen from the northern hemisphere and six as seen from the southern hemisphere.

Meteor Activity Outlook for June 15-21, 2013

During this period the moon reaches its first quarter phase on Sunday June 16th. At this time the half-illuminated moon is located ninety degrees east of the sun and is in the sky from dusk through 0100 local daylight time (LDT). As the week progresses the waxing gibbous moon will set later and later, encroaching on the more active morning hours and reducing the number of meteors to be seen. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near two as seen from the northern hemisphere and three as seen from south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near nine as seen from the northern hemisphere and thirteen as seen from the southern hemisphere.

Meteor Activity Outlook for June 8-14, 2013

During this period the moon reaches its new phase on Saturday June 8th. At this time the moon is located near the sun and is not visible at night. As the week progresses the waxing crescent moon will enter the evening sky but will set long before the more productive morning hours arrive. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near three as seen from the northern hemisphere and four as seen from south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near eight as seen from the northern hemisphere and fourteen as seen from the southern hemisphere.