Activity Outlook

Weekly Meteor Activity Outlook articles by Bob Lunsford. Bob gives outlooks to upcoming meteor activity about once a week. He features showers from the working list of meteor showers as well as suspected radiants. Please refer only to the radiants of the Working list of visual meteor showers in observing reports.

Meteor Activity Outlook for March 16-22, 2013

During this period the moon reaches its first quarter phase on Tuesday March 19th. At this time the moon is located ninety degrees east of the sun and will set near 0100 local daylight time (LDT) as seen from mid-northern latitudes. This weekend the waxing crescent moon will set during the late evening hours, allowing dark skies to prevail during the more active morning hours. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near two as seen from the northern hemisphere and four as seen from south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near eight from the mid-northern hemisphere and seventeen from the mid-southern hemisphere.

Meteor Activity Outlook for March 9-15, 2013

During this period the moon reaches its new phase on Monday March 11th. At this time the moon is located near the sun and cannot be seen at night. Late in this period the waxing crescent moon will enter the evening sky but will not interfere with meteor observing whatsoever. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near two as seen from the northern hemisphere and five as seen from south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near eight from the mid-northern hemisphere and eighteen from the mid-southern hemisphere.

Meteor Activity Outlook for March 2-8, 2013

As seen from the northern hemisphere, March is the slowest month for meteor activity. No major annual showers are active and only a few very weak minor showers produce activity this month. The sporadic rates are also near their annual minimum so there is not much to look forward to this month except for the evening fireballs that seem to peak this time of year from the northern hemisphere. This could be due to the fact the Antapex radiant lies highest above the horizon this time of year during the evening hours. From the southern hemisphere, activity from the Centaurid complex begins to wane with only the weak activity visible from Norma and perhaps others areas nearby.

Meteor Activity Outlook for February 23-March 1, 2013

During this period the moon reaches its full phase on Monday February 25th. At this time the moon will be located opposite the sun and will be in the sky all night long. As the week progresses the moon will rise a little later each evening but there is little meteor activity to be seen during the dark evening hours. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near one for observers located at mid-northern latitudes and three for observers in mid-southern latitudes. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near three from the mid-northern hemisphere and seven from the mid-southern hemisphere.

Meteor Activity Outlook for February 16-22, 2013

During this period the moon reaches its first quarter phase on Sunday February 17th. At this time the moon is located ninety degrees east of the sun and sets near midnight local standard time (LST) as seen from mid-northern latitudes. As the week progresses the waxing gibbous moon will set during the early morning hours, allowing a few hours of dark skies between the time of moon set and the beginning of morning twilight. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near two as seen from the northern hemisphere and four as seen from south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near eight from the mid-northern hemisphere and seventeen from the mid-southern hemisphere.

Meteor Activity Outlook for February 9-15, 2013

During this period the moon reaches its new phase on Sunday February 10th. At this time the moon is located near the sun and is invisible at night. As the week progresses the waxing crescent moon will enter the evening sky but will not interfere with meteor observing. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near three as seen from the northern hemisphere and five as seen from south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near nine from the mid-northern hemisphere and eighteen from the mid-southern hemisphere.