Activity Outlook

Weekly Meteor Activity Outlook articles by Bob Lunsford. Bob gives outlooks to upcoming meteor activity about once a week. He features showers from the working list of meteor showers as well as suspected radiants. Please refer only to the radiants of the Working list of visual meteor showers in observing reports.

Meteor Activity Outlook for March 21-27, 2015

During this period the moon will reach its first quarter phase on Thursday March 26th. At this time the moon is located 90 degrees east of the sun and sets near 0100 local daylight saving time (LDT). This weekend the waxing crescent moon will enter the evening sky but will set early during the evening hours allowing unhampered views of the night sky the remainder of the night. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 3 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 4 for observers viewing from the southern tropics (latitude 25 S.). For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 7 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 10 for observers viewing from the southern tropics.

Meteor Activity Outlook for March 14-20, 2015

During this period the moon will reach its new phase on Friday March 20th. At this time the moon is located near the sun and is invisible at night. This weekend the waning crescent moon will rise during the early morning hours and will interfere with meteor observing if not kept out of ones field of view. Viewing conditions improve with each passing morning as the moon's phase wanes and it rises later each morning. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 3 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 4 for observers viewing from the southern tropics (latitude 25 S.).

Meteor Activity Outlook for March 7-13, 2015

During this period the moon will reach its last quarter phase on Friday March 13th. At that time the moon is located 90 degrees west of the sun and rises near 0100 local daylight saving time. This weekend the waning gibbous moon will rise during the late evening hours effectively ruining the remainder of the night for meteor observing. This entire period will be a poor time to try and view meteor activity due to the bright moon present during the morning hours. The evening hours are less effective but rates are low even with the absence of moonlight.

Meteor Activity Outlook for February 28-March 6, 2015

As seen from the northern hemisphere, March is the slowest month for meteor activity. No major annual showers are active and only a few very weak minor showers produce activity this month. The sporadic rates are also near their annual minimum so there is not much to look forward to this month except for the evening fireballs that seem to peak this time of year from the northern hemisphere. This could be due to the fact the Antapex radiant lies highest above the horizon this time of year during the evening hours. From the southern hemisphere, activity from the Centaurid complex begins to wane with only the weak activity visible from Norma and perhaps others areas nearby.

Meteor Activity Outlook for February 28-March 6, 2015

As seen from the northern hemisphere, March is the slowest month for meteor activity. No major annual showers are active and only a few very weak minor showers produce activity this month. The sporadic rates are also near their annual minimum so there is not much to look forward to this month except for the evening fireballs that seem to peak this time of year from the northern hemisphere. This could be due to the fact the Antapex radiant lies highest above the horizon this time of year during the evening hours. From the southern hemisphere, activity from the Centaurid complex begins to wane with only the weak activity visible from Norma and perhaps others areas nearby.

Meteor Activity Outlook for February 14-20, 2015

This week sees the moon finally giving way to dark skies but the meteor activity will be slow despite the absence of moonlight. Most of the activity this week is reserved for observers in the southern hemisphere as there are 3 active radiants in the southern constellation of Centaurus. Southern sporadic rates are also near their peak while northern rates continue to dwindle.