Activity Outlook

Weekly Meteor Activity Outlook articles by Bob Lunsford. Bob gives outlooks to upcoming meteor activity about once a week. He features showers from the working list of meteor showers as well as suspected radiants. Please refer only to the radiants of the Working list of visual meteor showers in observing reports.

Meteor Activity Outlook for July 26-August 1, 2014

During this period the moon reaches its new phase on Saturday July 26th. At this time the moon will located near the sun and will be invisible at night. Later this week the waxing crescent moon will enter the evening sky but will set during the evening hours. The more active morning hours will not be affected by moonlight. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 4 as seen from the northern hemisphere and 3 as seen from southern tropical latitudes. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 30 no matter your location. The actual rates will also depend on factors such as personal light and motion perception, local weather conditions, alertness and experience in watching meteor activity.

Meteor Activity Outlook for July 19-25, 2014

During this period the moon reaches its last quarter phase on Saturday July 19th. At this time the half-illuminated moon will rise near midnight LDT (Local Daylight Time) as seen from mid-northern latitudes. This weekend the moon will hamper morning observations as it is above the horizon during most of the morning hours. With each passing night though, the situation becomes more favorable as the moon wanes and rises approximately 45 minutes later each night. By the end of the week the moon will not be a factor at all. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 4 no matter your location.

Meteor Activity Outlook for July 5-11, 2014

During this period the moon reaches its first quarter phase on Saturday July 5th. At this time the half-illuminated moon will set near midnight LDT (Local Daylight Time) as seen from mid-northern latitudes . The morning hours will be free of interfering moonlight allowing meteor observers the best possible view of early July activity. With each passing night the moon sets approximately 45 minutes later so by the end of the week the moon will be in the sky nearly all night long. So the key for this period is to view early before the moon becomes too much of a problem.

Meteor Activity Outlook for June 14-20, 2014

During this period the moon reaches its last quarter phase on Thursday June 19th. At this time the moon will lie 90 degrees west of the sun and will rise between midnight and 0100 local daylight (LDT) time as seen from mid-northern locations. This weekend the waning gibbous moon will rise a few hours after dusk and will remain above the horizon the remainder of the night. The bright moon will make it difficult to view any meteor activity as the lunar glare will obscure all but the brightest meteors. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 1 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 2 for observers viewing from the southern tropics (latitude 25 S.).

Meteor Activity Outlook for June 7-13, 2014

During this period the moon reaches its full phase on Thursday June 12th. At this time the moon will lie opposite the sun and will lie above the horizon most of the night as seen from mid-northern locations. This weekend the waxing gibbous moon will set a few hours before dawn, allowing a little time to view meteor activity under the dark skies between moonset and the start of dawn. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 2 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 3 for observers viewing from the southern tropics (latitude 25 S.). For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 8 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 12 for observers viewing from the southern tropics.

Meteor Activity Outlook for May 31-June 6, 2014

During this period the moon reaches its first quarter phase on Thursday June 5th. At this time the moon will lie 90 degrees east of the sun and will set near 0100 local daylight time (LDT) as seen from mid-northern locations. This weekend the waxing crescent moon will set shortly after the end of dusk allowing the remainder of the night to be free of interfering moonlight. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 3 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 4 for observers viewing from the southern tropics (latitude 25 S.). For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 8 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 12 for observers viewing from the southern tropics.